Network of Industry Committees

Alberta’s network of trade- and occupation-specific industry committees ensures employers and employees have equal input into our province’s apprenticeship and industry training system.

Watch a video about getting involved in your trade’s provincial apprenticeship committee:

 

The network is made up of the following groups:

1. Local Apprenticeship Committees (LACs)

These committees are the ‘grassroots’ of the apprenticeship and industry training system for designated trades, and are initiated in regions with high levels of activity in the trade.

  • Employers and employees are equally represented, with members appointed by the Alberta Apprenticeship and Industry Training Board for terms of up to three years.
  • A Government of Alberta staff member serves as secretary.

What they do

Committee members are responsible for:

  • monitoring local activities and updating their trade’s Provincial Apprenticeship Committee (PAC) with local information,
  • monitoring the apprenticeship system and the progress of apprentices in their trade at the local (regional) level,
  • making recommendations to their trade’s PAC regarding apprenticeship training and certification,
  • making recommendations to the Board regarding appointment of members to their trade’s PAC, and
  • helping to settle disputes between apprentices and their employers in matters relating to the Apprenticeship and Industry Training Act.

2. Provincial Apprenticeship Committees (PACs)

These committees are the link between the LACs and the Alberta Apprenticeship and Industry Training Board and are responsible for making recommendations to the Board about training and certification requirements and standards for designated trades.

  • Employers and employees are equally represented, with members appointed by the Alberta Apprenticeship and Industry Training Board for terms of up to three years.
  • A Government of Alberta staff member serves as secretary.

What They Do

Committee members are responsible for:

  • making recommendations to the Board regarding apprenticeship training and certification,
  • monitoring the Local Apprenticeship Committees in their trade,
  • identifying the training needs and content for their trade,
  • determining if programs and courses provided outside apprenticeship are equivalent to an Alberta apprenticeship program, and
  • helping to settle disputes between apprentices and their employers in matters relating to the Apprenticeship and Industry Training Act.

3. Occupational Committees (OCs)

These committees are the ‘grassroots’ of the apprenticeship and industry training system for designated occupations, with employers and employees equally represented.

  • Consists of at least three members, who are appointed by the Alberta Apprenticeship and Industry Training Board for terms of up to three years.
  • A Government of Alberta staff member serves as secretary.

What They Do

Committee members are responsible for:

  • making recommendations to the Board regarding training and certification matters in their occupation, and
  • monitoring training programs, work experience programs and the progress of trainees.

4. Provisional Committees (PCs)

These committees review applications for designation and provide advice to the Alberta Apprenticeship and Industry Training Board about proposed new designations and the development of training and certification standards of the trade or occupation. The Board appoints members, including a presiding officer, for a terms of up to three years, and government assigns a staff member to serve as the committee secretary.